Choir Performs Amid the Flowers at Wimbourne St Giles.

 

 

Photographs by Colleen Gauntlett

On July 15th 2017, some sixty members of Caldicot Male Voice Choir travelled through the quiet country lanes and rolling hillsides of Wiltshire and Dorset to finally arrive in an area of outstanding beauty at the picturesque village of Wimbourne St GIles, home of the Earls of Shaftesbury.  Every year the St Giles Church Council bedecks the church in a wonderful display of flower arrangements and sculptures.  This year’s theme was ‘Country Ways’ and the choir positioned itself against the magnificent wooden screen of the 18th century Georgian church surrounded by over thirty magnificent floral displays.

The Choir, conducted by Siân Hatton and accompanied by Stephen Berry and John Nicholson performed a wide mix of favourites including Welsh hymns Rachie, Cwm Rhondda, Laudamus, Eli Jenkins’ Prayer and Malotte’s The Lord’s Prayer through to fast moving The Lady is a Tramp, With a Voice of Singing and Ride the Chariot.  These pieces contrasted with the Welsh songs ‘Anfonaf Angel’ the traditional, tragic, Welsh folk song, ‘Bugeilio’r Gwenith Gwyn’, ‘The Impossible Dream’ featured in The Man of La Mancha and ‘Mansions of the Lord’ from the film ‘We are Soldiers’.  The choir also delighted the audience with its premier performance of ‘Shenandoah’. In a long, varied programme, Siân Hatton delighted the audience with a rendition of the humorous Marriott Edgar poem ‘Albert and the Lion’ accompanied on piano by Stephen Berry.

The programme included a performance from a four piece brass ensemble made up from young pupils of the local Queen Elizabeth School who delighted the audience with an exploration of musical styles beginning with ‘Fly me to the Moon’ included Baroque, Handel’s ‘Hornpipe’ from Water Music, Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake right through to ‘Sir Duke’ by Stevie Wonder and ‘La Cucaracha’, finalising with the Glenn Miller classic ‘In the Mood’..  The foursome form part of the thirty odd strong School orchestra who perform over thirty concerts a year.

Following rapturous applause from the audience and words of appreciation and a request to visit again from the Rector, the reverend David Paskins the choir left to board the coach to nearby Cranborne and the Sheaf of Arrows for well deserved refreshment.

 

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